Sommersemster 2018


Die LTS LunchTimeSeries on Law, Technology and Society startet ins Sommersemester 2018!

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Iris Eisenberger, M.Sc. (LSE), Universität für Bodenkultur Wien, und Univ.-Prof. Dr. Konrad Lachmayer, Sigmund Freud Privatuniversität Wien, organisieren die erfolgreiche Vortragsreihe bereits das fünfte Semester in Folge.

Im Sommersemester 2018 beginnt die Reihe am 25. April mit einem Vortrag von Prof. Sheila Jasanoff, Harvard University, zu dem Thema "Distributed Selves: Technology and Rights in the Digital Age".

Am 9. Mai ist Dr. Nicolas Lampach, Centre for Legal Theory and Empirical Jurisprudence, KU Leuven, zu Gast und hält einen Vortrag zu "Law meets Data Science: Findings from the EUTHORITY Project".

Den dritten Vortrag am 15. Juni hält Prof. Jørn Øyrehagen Sunde von der University of Bergen. Er spricht über "The Robot Judge: Law, Technology and Historical Patterns of Change".

Den vierten und letzten Vortrag dieses Semsters hält Prof. Melanie Dulong de Rosnay, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), Sorbonne Université, am 28. Juni. Sie trägt zu dem Thema "Peer-to-Peer Law and the Commons" vor.

Nach den Vorträgen laden wir zur öffentlichen Diskussion ein. In anglo-amerikanischer Tradition wird für Verpflegung gesorgt. Die Veranstaltung ist frei zugänglich; die Teilnahme ist kostenlos.

Wir ersuchen um Anmeldung unter law@boku.ac.at.

Das gesamte Programm als PDF finden Sie hier.

Distributed Selves: Technology and Rights in the Digital Age

Distributed Selves: Technology and Rights in the Digital Age

Date & Time: 25 April 2018, 12.00 - 1.30 pm

Location: Guttenberghaus SR 01, Feistmantelstraße 4, 1180 Vienna.

Please register until 23 April 2018 via law@boku.ac.at.


It is 2018. In the era of cell lines, genome editing, and digital shadows, do you know who and where you are, let alone what your rights are and how these are to be protected?  How can constitutions and laws drafted for a simpler time — a time when our bodies, minds, and selves seemed more integrated — rise to the challenges of this fragmented age?  In this talk, I combine thinking from legal studies and science and technology studies to indicate why we need renewed reflection on the idea of the “human” to which we have attached so much of our thinking on rights.

Prof. Sheila Jasanoff, Harvard University:
Sheila Jasanoff is Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies at the Harvard Kennedy School. A pioneer in her field, she has authored more than 120 articles and chapters and is author or editor of more than 15 books, including The Fifth Branch, Science at the Bar, Designs on Nature, and The Ethics of Invention. Her work explores the role of science and technology in the law, politics, and policy of modern democracies. She founded and directs the STS Program at Harvard; previously, she was founding chair of the STS Department at Cornell. She has held distinguished visiting appointments at leading universities in Europe, Asia, Australia, and the US. Jasanoff served on the AAAS Board of Directors and as President of the Society for Social Studies of Science. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Her honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship, the University of Ghent Sarton Chair, an Ehrenkreuz from the Government of Austria, and membership in the Royal Danish Academy. She holds AB, JD, and PhD degrees from Harvard, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Twente.


The lecture will be followed by an open discussion. In Anglo-American tradition, catering will be provided during the lecture. The event is open for everyone and participation is free of charge.

You can find the announcement of Prof. Jasanoff's lecture as PDF-File here.

The LunchTimeSeries on Law, Technology & Society (LTS) is organized by Prof. Iris Eisenberger, in collaboration with Prof. Konrad Lachmayer. You can find the complete programm of the semester here.

 

 

Law meets Data Science: Findings from the EUTHORITY Project

Law meets Data Science: Findings from the EUTHORITY Project

Date & Time: 9 May 2018, 12.00 - 1.30 pm

Location: Gregor-Mendel-Haus Hörsaal VII, 2. Stock, Gregor-Mendel-Straße 33, 1180 Vienna.

Please register until 7 May 2018 via law@boku.ac.at.


Can algorithms, knowledge visualization and natural language processing techniques help us understand the law better? We apply data-mining, machine learning and natural language processing methods to collect, classify, visualize and analyse EU law materials. While offering new insights into the legal integration process, our research shows that these methods can greatly enhance the capacity of lawyers and legal practitioners to predict judicial outcomes and to navigate large collections of legal documents.

Dr. Nicolas Lampach, Centre for Legal Theory and Empirical Jurisprudence, KU Leuven:
Nicolas Lampach is Research Associate with the EUTHORITY project and Postdoc fellow at the Centre for Legal Theory and Empirical Jurisprudence at KU Leuven University. He works in the fields of Judicial Behaviour, Decision Making, Applied Econometrics and Agricultural Economics. Prior to joining the EUTHORITY research project, he worked as a PhD candidate (Excellence Initiative Fellowship) in Economic Sciences at the University of Strasbourg and his PhD thesis deals with the optimal technological risk management in the presence of ambiguity.  His current research work focuses on the empirical analysis of law and courts; automated content analysis techniques to legal texts and developing forecasting techniques to predict upcoming court cases.


The lecture will be followed by an open discussion. In Anglo-American tradition, catering will be provided during the lecture. The event is open for everyone and participation is free of charge.

You can find the announcement of Dr. Lampach's lecture as PDF-File here.

The LunchTimeSeries on Law, Technology & Society (LTS) is organized by Prof. Iris Eisenberger, in collaboration with Prof. Konrad Lachmayer. You can find the complete programm of the semester here.

The Robot Judge: Law, Technology and Historical Patterns of Change

The Robot Judge: Law, Technology and Historical Patterns of Change

Date & Time: 15 June 2018, 12.00 - 1.30 pm

Location: Simony Haus SR 19/2, Peter-Jordan-Straße 65, 1180 Vienna

Please register until 12 June 2018 via law@boku.ac.at.


When will we see the first robot judge in action? Technology is a fundamental structure shaping society and hence law. Throughout history technological change has brought radical legal changes several times. By examining these periods of change, we can identify patterns that are helpful to understand the changes in law that technology is bringing about in our own time. We will then see that the robot judge is a rather old idea that still faces some serious obstacles.

Prof. Jørn Øyrehagen Sunde, University of Bergen:

CURRENT POSITIONS
2007‐ Professor at the Faculty of Law, University of Bergen, Norway
2002‐ Head of Research at the Museum the Barony Rosendal, University of Oslo, Norway

EDUCATION
2007 PhD (Disputation date: 16 June 2007), Faculty of Law, University of Bergen, Norway
1999 Master, Faculty of Law, University of Bergen, Norway


The lecture will be followed by an open discussion. In Anglo-American tradition, catering will be provided during the lecture. The event is open for everyone and participation is free of charge.

Further information about Prof. Sunde and his lecture is available here.

The LunchTimeSeries on Law, Technology & Society (LTS) is organized by Prof. Iris Eisenberger, in collaboration with Prof. Konrad Lachmayer. You can find the complete programm of the semester here.