Winter term 2018/19


LTS LunchTimeSeries on Law, Technology and Society enters into the Winter Term 2018/19!

For the sixth consecutive semester, Univ.-Prof. Dr. Iris Eisenberger, M.Sc. (LSE), Institute of Law at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, and Univ.-Prof. Dr. Konrad Lachmayer, Sigmund Freud University, Vienna, are organising the Lunch Time Series on Law, Technology and Society (LTS).

In the winter term 2018/19, the series will start with a lecture given by Prof. Alain Strowel, University of Louvain (UCLouvain), on "From the Cloud to the Edge: New Ways for Data Appropriation"on 12 October 2018. You can find the announcement here.

On 13 December 2018 Prof. Joanna Bryson, University of Bath, will give a lecture on "Human control of machine intelligence". You can find the announcement here.

As our third guest in this semester, we will welcome Prof. Susanne Beck, LL.M. (LSE), Leibniz University Hannover, on 17 December 2018. She will talk about "Strafbarkeit beim Einsatz autonomer Systeme - Neue Impulse für das Konzept der Fahrlässigkeit?". You can find the announcement here.

After each lecture, there will be an opportunity for public discussion. Based on the Anglo-American model of the Lunch Time Series, the Institute of Law will provide catering. The event is open to all and participation is free of charge.

Please register in advance at: law(at)boku.ac.at.

You can find the complete programm of the semester here.

From the Cloud to the Edge: New Ways for Data Appropriation

From the Cloud to the Edge: New Ways for Data Appropriation

  • "From the Cloud to the Edge: New Ways for Data Appropriation", an LTS lecture by Professor Alain Strowel (UCLouvain)
  • 12 October 2018
  • 12:00 - 13:30
  • Guttenberghaus, Conference Room EG 04, Ground Floor
    Feistmantelstraße 4, 1180 Wien
    University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (BOKU)

The lecture will be followed by an open discussion. In Anglo-American tradition, catering will be provided during the lecture. The event is open for everyone and participation is free of charge.

Please register until 8 October 2018 via law(at)boku.ac.at.

As our homes get smarter and our electronic devices increasingly interconnected, we start to get a sense of what the Internet of Things (IoT) might look like. As IoT increasingly materializes, data processing becomes less centralized and is pushed closer to the edge of the network, i.e. closer to where the data is created. Data analysis moves from the cloud to the edge. The EU legal framework currently provides for various property-like protections that allow private parties some control over the use of their data. However, edge computing challenges European data protection law in novel ways. This talk explores possible legal responses.

Alain Strowel is Professor of law at the UCLouvain. He has both pub-lished and taught extensively in the fields of intellectual property, internet and media law. After graduating in law, economics and phi-losophy at the UCLouvain and the University of Amsterdam, he has been a practicing lawyer for many years working, among others, for the leading international law firm Covington & Burling LLP. An expert in digital copyright, he also teaches at the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center (MIPLC), regularly authors studies for Belgian and EU public institutions, and is an arbiter for domain-name disputes. Strowel is a keen commentator of current events in his field and fre-quently posts on IPdigIT, a blog about Intellectual Property (IP), the digital economy (DIGIT) and Information Technology (IT) in Europe.

You can find a PDF of the announcement here.

Human Control of Machine Intelligence

Human Control of Machine Intelligence

  • "Human control of machine intelligence", an LTS lecture by Professor Joana Bryson (University of Bath)
  • 13 December 2018
  • 12:00 - 13:30
  • Guttenberghaus, Seminar Room SR 03, Ground Floor
    Feistmantelstraße 4, 1180 Wien
    University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (BOKU)

The lecture will be followed by an open discussion. In Anglo-American tradition, catering will be provided during the lecture. The event is open for everyone and participation is free of charge.

Please register until 10 December 2018 via law(at)boku.ac.at.

Although not a universally-held goal, maintaining human control of artificial intelligence is probably essential for society’s long-term stability. Fortunately, the legal and technological problems of maintaining control are actually fairly well understood and amenable to engineering. The real problem is establishing the social and political will for assigning and maintaining accountability for artefacts when these artefacts are generated or used. In this talk I will discuss why we should maintain not only control but responsibility for AI, whether we have control now, and what technolog-ical and regulatory steps we can take to improve the present situation for the benefit of the very long term.

Joanna J. Bryson is a transdisciplinary researcher on the structure and dynamics of human- and animal-like intelligence. Her research covering topics from artificial intelligence, through autonomy and robot ethics, and on to human cooperation has appeared in venues ranging from a reddit to Science. She holds degrees in Psychology from Chicago and Edinburgh, and Artificial Intelligence from Edinburgh and MIT. She has additional professional research experience from Princeton, Oxford, Harvard, and LEGO, and technical experience in Chicago's financial industry, and international management consultancy. Bryson is presently a Reader (associate professor) at the University of Bath.

You can find a PDF of the announcement here.

Strafbarkeit beim Einsatz autonomer Systeme – Neue Impulse für das Konzept der Fahrlässigkeit?

Strafbarkeit beim Einsatz autonomer Systeme – Neue Impulse für das Konzept der Fahrlässigkeit?

  • "Strafbarkeit beim Einsatz autonomer Systeme – Neue Impulse für
    das Konzept der Fahrlässigkeit?", an LTS lecture by Professor Dr. Susanne Beck (Leibniz University Hannover)
  • 17 December 2018
  • 12:00 - 13:30
  • Oskar-Simony-Haus, Seminar Room SR 19/1, Attic Floor
    Peter-Jordan-Straße 65, 1180 Wien
    University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (BOKU)

The lecture will be followed by an open discussion. In Anglo-American tradition, catering will be provided during the lecture. The event is open for everyone and participation is free of charge.

Please register until 12 December 2018 via law(at)boku.ac.at.

Die zunehmende Autonomie von Maschinen stellt das Recht vor viele neue Herausforderungen. Die Entwicklung bringt bisher unbekannte Risiken mit sich. Die Entscheidung der Maschine im Einzelfall wird unvorhersehbar und unkontrollierbar. Im Nachhinein ist eine eindeutige Zurechnung eines schädigenden Ereignisses zu einem spezifischen Fehlverhalten selten möglich. All dies erschwert eine eindeutige Zuordnung im Bereich der Fahrlässigkeit und klare Festlegung von Verhaltensregeln. Aber passt das traditionelle Fahrlässigkeitskonzept überhaupt noch zu derart globalen, unvorhersehbaren technologischen Entwicklungen? Oder können diese Entwicklungen gerade dazu beitragen, althergebrachte und vielleicht veraltete Strukturen aufzubrechen und neue Lösungen zu entwickeln?

Susanne Beck, Master of Law (LSE), Promotion und Habilitation an der Universität Würzburg (2006 und 2013) ist seit 2013 Professorin für u.a. Strafrecht und Rechtsphilosophie an der Leibniz Universität Hannover. Seit über zehn Jahren befasst sie sich mit verschiedenen rechtlichen Fragen der Entwicklungen im Bereich Robotik und KI, auch als Mitglied bei acatech, der Plattform Lernende Systeme oder der Foundation for Responsible Robotics.

You can find a PDF of the announcement (in German) here.